Shoot yeah - I use paper

When I was a kid, we were forbidden to use curse-words - but mom also forbade us to use euphemisms for curse-words (e.g. darn, heck, gosh). Even to this day, I know that if I were to use salty-language, my mom would find a way to force me to the floor and wash my mouth out with soap.

But at some point in my childhood, I discovered that my mom uses a euphemism as well - she says "shoot" all the time. When I called this to her attention, she told me to "Shut up!" We're not supposed to say "shut up" either ;-)

For all of my exhortation to going paperless, and leveraging technology to improve workflows, paper is my "shoot" - I still use paper to navigate my way through the day. I think it's a great way to keep my shoot together, and I think you should give a shoot as well.

The Problem

As I've mentioned before, OmniFocus is the nerve-center of all my projects and tasks. But having a task-managing database in electronic form does present several problems that a hybrid approach can address:

  1. Capture: I am all thumbs when it comes to typing on a smartphone. It takes me a great deal of focus and time to get things typed correctly. I frankly thought that this was a problem unique to people my age and older, but I've begun asking my students about phone-typing. They tell me that, while they can type quickly, they also have to edit a great deal. Sometimes writing things down can be a lot faster.
  2. Distraction: When I grab my phone to check for the "next action," I'm actually presented with a wide-range of well-meaning distractions. I don't mean Facebook; in fact, some of the distractions are really important. I may discover that students have submitted work in the LMS, and I want to see how they did. I may have an important email from the Provost. I may have even come into some money from a Nigerian prince. My phone is a lot like my fridge - I can go there looking for carrots, and come away with chocolate pudding.
  3. Face-to-which-face: I do capture tasks into my OmniFocus while in conversation with others, but that does mean that I need to stop the conversation and enter information. There are a lot of times where this distraction actually damages the conversation; I'm looking at my phone (or talking to my phone) instead of the person. Writing things down is not only faster, but more conducive to keeping discussion going.
  4. Microtasks: I have a heater under my desk to keep my feet warm. When I turn it on, I need to remember to turn it off before I leave work. I'm not sure whether that task really requires that I open OmniFocus, create a task, schedule a reminder, and figure out its context. It's a little thing that I want to complete, but not something that really warrants the time to create the task.

The Solution

Each morning, during my morning planning routine, I open OmniFocus, my calendar, and my Moleskine. I process any tasks that are in my inbox, clean up the calendar, and decide what tasks need to be done for the day. For those who follow a GTD-like method, this should be familiar. But I also write the tasks (on the left page) and the appointments (on the right page) in my notebook, and identify two or three big tasks that will result in a successful day.

When new tasks emerge throughout the day, I log those on the task list in the notebook. If I finish them before the end of the day, they may never show in my OmniFocus. If I don't finish them by the end of the day, I usually capture them and process them in OmniFocus. Every once in a while, I'll migrate a task to a following day without logging it in OmniFocus, especially if it's a micro-task that I'll do tomorrow.

I have discovered several keys to doing this effectively and efficiently:

  • Morning Routine - Open the task manager and choose tasks that need to be done today. I mark the ones that came from my OmniFocus with an O so that I know they need to be marked off in OmniFocus (later). I also scratch out my calendar for the day.
  • During the day - New tasks are added in the notebook. Any chicken-scratch that I need to scribble down (e.g. a phone number) goes under the schedule portion of the notebook.
  • End of the Day - When I'm ready to wind down, I migrate incomplete tasks into OmniFocus, and process my inboxes. By the time I have processed my in-boxes, the notebook is closed for the day.

I use a notation system for tasks that help me track not only priority, but also which tasks need to be checked off in OmniFocus, or added to OmniFocus.

✓ = Done
→ = Moved forward, not in OmniFocus
O ← = Migrated into OmniFocus to be done someday later
! = "Big Important Things To Do" (I try to have several of these each day)
X = Deleted task
D ← = Delegated task migrated into OmniFocus

Tips and Tricks

  1. Nothing Fancy - I don't spend a great deal of time with making my notebook pretty or fancy. These pages need to simply help me make it through the day. I've seen some very elegant Bullet Journals that look remarkable - but if I spent half the time doing that, I'd miss out on doing some things that are really important and valuable for me.
  2. Waste Pages - Some days have finished with almost nothing on them. I recently spent an entire day working on a data-set, so I had three tasks and no appointments. I still started the next day on the next page.
  3. Daily Planning - At a minimum, this approach will only work if one plans at least once a day. I finish my day by processing any captured and incomplete tasks back into OmniFocus. 
  4. Note-Taking - I still keep notes in Evernote as often as I possibly can. When I capture something in the notebook that really needs to be in Evernote, I'll scan it with Scannable and send it to Evernote. Usually, though, these are scratches that don't need to go anywhere. For example, I was trying to call Anthony, but I couldn't reach him. I scratched his phone number down so that I wouldn't have to go back to my contact manager every time I wanted to try again.
  5. Specialty Lists - I have a few running lists in the back of the notebook. These eventually find their way into Evernote, but I can quickly capture items that relate to one another. For example, I have a running list of research questions that pop up when I'm working with others. I also have a Netflix list, a reading list, and a list of people I promised I'd have lunch with some day.

Image Credit: http://bit.ly/1nSmWlm

Posted on February 5, 2016 and filed under General, Task Management, GTD.